Posts Tagged ‘tv’

New MGEU ads profile the real people – and services – behind the word “clerical”

Monday, October 20th, 2014

A mosaic of stills from two MGEU ads

Sometimes a vague phrase can hide an important idea — or some important people.

Take “clerical workers”. For most people, those words probably don’t create much of a picture in their heads. Whatever image they do get probably involves paper and not much else.

That’s partly because a lot of the work those employees do happens behind the scenes. Their jobs are a big part of what makes the work of more visible public-sector workers — such as teachers, firefighters, nurses or librarians — as effective and valuable as it is.

That’s the challenge the Manitoba Government and General Employees’ Union decided to take on with their latest campaign: replacing that vague image with real human faces.

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Preventing the next disaster: Teamsters Canada campaigns for safer freight rail

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

2014.10.14.teamsters-rail-safety-block-graphic.en

In July of last year, a runaway crude-oil freight train exploded in Lac-Mégantic, killing at least 42 people and devastating the town's centre. It was the deadliest rail disaster in Canada in nearly 150 years… but by no means the only one, with a freight rail accident happening every 60 hours.

In the aftermath of Lac-Mégantic, Canadians have been asking tough questions about rail safety and deregulation. And Teamsters Canada, whose 1250,000 members include more than 12,000 rail workers, is campaigning hard for safer rail transportation.

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Protecting public services by talking about the elephant in the room

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

ElephantTalk.ca public service awareness campaign logoListen to the public conversation that goes on around government budgets, and you’d swear the only important questions are whether they’re balanced, whether they cut taxes and whether they reduce spending.

The impact those budget decisions have on public services? That usually gets lip service — at best.

That’s partly because many media decision-makers are happy to limit budget conversation to conservative turf. But it’s also because it makes for a simple, easy-to-tell story: lines on graphs go up or down, figures are positive or negative, bond rating agencies are happy or grumpy, and dash 30 dash the article’s done.

Stories about the impact those numbers will have on transit services, ambulance response times or your local library’s supply of new books demand a lot more digging, research and analysis. So too often, they just don’t get told – and the growing pressure on services becomes an elephant in the room.

The Manitoba Government and General Employees’ Union is working to change that, starting with a new campaign we’ve helped them to launch. (more…)

Five ways the BC Teachers’ Federation scored on Super Bowl Sunday

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Image from BCTF ad SharingOn Sunday, the roughly one million British Columbians who watched Super Bowl ads pitching everything from pickup trucks to snack foods saw something else, too: a message promoting better schools for BC kids.

The ad, titled “Sharing,” came from the BC Teachers’ Federation, who worked with us on a very tight timeline to produce an ad intended to air just once. And the reaction was immediate: an outpouring on Twitter, and viewers flocking to YouTube to see it again or catch what they’d missed.

Events like the Super Bowl, where a huge audience focuses its attention on one thing, represent a huge opportunity. But getting a share of that attention (and making it work for you!) takes some smart, careful thinking… especially when your audience isn’t expecting to hear from you. (more…)

Telling the real story of collective bargaining: CUPE Ontario

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Still image from the ad, showing a worker shaking hands with an employerCommunicating around specific issues can be highly effective, often involving focused messages, sharply defined goals and tangible outcomes.

But sometimes you’re aiming higher. You want to change not just opinions on an issue, but the underlying attitudes, assumptions and narrative that drive those opinions.

When Ontario’s Liberal government targeted collective bargaining rights for school board workers with Bill 115, CUPE Ontario recognized it as the first assault in a campaign against fundamental rights for all public employees. And they saw that assault as part of the right-wing narrative about collective bargaining: that it always results in inefficiency and conflict, disrupting services and holding back economic growth. (more…)